Language Barriers

We just found out that today, the 30th of September, is a day we should celebrate; 
Happy international translation day everyone! In the spirit of this day we would like to dedicate this blogpost to our kind, understanding and fabulous translator, Ntoetse.

The Norwegian Translation Society (Norsk Oversetterforening) tells us that this day celebrate Saint Eusebius Hieronymus Sophronius (347-420), also known as Saint Jerome. His most known work is the translation of the Bible from Greek/Hebraic to Latin, Vulgata. In the Catholic church Vulgata is still used, though with some changes. 

Today the Federation Internationales des Traductuers, FIT (International Federation of Translators) enlightens his importance in the matter of communication. His translation of the Bible to Latin made one of the most influential books in history more available for a bigger part of the world, and in modern days society this work could be seen as one of the earliest steps in the development of communication lines and understanding of human views. Even across religions.

FITs motto for 2015 is “Languages Rights: Essential To All Human Rights”. As foreigners in a new country with great enthusiasm for their language, we can relate to this. Still waiting for Sesotho lessons to start, we’re really looking forward to learn this language! 

FA-training at the district office

FA-training at the district office

In light of this day we find it appropriate to tell you a little bit about the past week where we attended a first aid training for elderly at the district office and a disaster preparedness workshop, all conducted in Sesotho. We got the opportunity to observe and experience how Lesotho Red Cross conduct their trainings. On tuesday local FA-instructors facilitated for a group of men and women, and we got to participate. Wednesday we were picked up in the morning and driven to a recreational centre outside our village, to take part in a disaster preparedness workshop. The three day workshop gave us insight on the topics of first aid, security in case of fire, hazard analyses , food security and general disaster preparedness. At the end the participants used what they'd learned to create maps of their district with marks for different hazards. 

Disaster preparedness workshop: security in case of fire

Disaster preparedness workshop: security in case of fire

We had much needed help from Ntoetse all week. She was kind enough to be our translator and answer any question we came up with. Until we have managed to learn enough Sesotho to get by, we depend more on her than we like to admit. A BIG thank you goes out to this girl. 

- Ida & Astri