Serve with smile

8th of May is known as The World Red Cross and Cresent Day. The founder, Jean Henry Dunant, was born that day and is a day that is celebrated every year by the Red Cross and Red Cresent movement worldwide.

Last tuesday, 8th of May, was full of joy and excitement here in Nepal. As many of the Red Cross youths in Sunsari was eager to celebrate this day, me and Camilla had a full schedule from morning to evening. The day was even so hectic that we had to separate us self (and yes, it can happend even when one are co-delegates). I was lucky to be invited to celebrate this day with the youths in Morang District, while Camilla celebrated 8th of May with youth and staff members in our District Chapter Office at Sunsari District. 

At 0530am I meet some of the Red Cross volunteers from Sunsari to drive to Morang district, which is approx. 1,5h away from were we live. When we got there 200 Red Cross youth volunteers were ready to start a ralley around the city center. Eventhough I was exchusted because of the heat (and yes, 32 celsius to too hot when one are from Norway), it was so much fun to see the youths go around with their ralley slogans like e.g "serve with a smile" all day long. 

After the ralley, the day continued with Red Cross quiz, formal speeches, Henry Dunant cake cutting (which I was lucky to cut myself), competition and an income generation activity in Morang. We had a lot of fun and this was defintely my first time to see how big celebration 8th of May are for the Red Crossers worldwide! 

Continue to serve with smile,

Thanuya

Embrace the diversity around you

Sustainable development requires inclusion of everyone – so embrace the diversity in your local community – in your country – in the world!

 All the participants from the FK-Norway camp in August 2017 (Photo credit: FK-Norway).

All the participants from the FK-Norway camp in August 2017 (Photo credit: FK-Norway).

And where do you find diversity?

In Norway you find diversity – I have been surrounded by diversity throughout my education. Namely, because it’s been both boys and girls in my classes, and amongst my classmates there have been a pool of different interests and hobbies. I been living in different cities in Norway, however I perceive Oslo as “the diversity-city” in Norway. Strolling around in Oslo from one part of the city to another is something I love doing. When doing that I feel like I am travelling between different worlds. FASCINATING!

In South Africa you find diversity. Twice I been living in the country of Nelson Mandela. Every second, I found myself being surrounded by diversity in South Africa. Various articles and documents about South Africa, includes buzzwords like “diversity” or “rainbow-nation”. And for me, it is also this diversity that makes me keep on wanting to come back. I become so fascinated by the diversity you find in South Africa from history, culture, food, music, nature.

 Embracing the diversity of Cape Town, South Africa

Embracing the diversity of Cape Town, South Africa

In Nepal you find diversity – I have found diversity especially in the various of cultures I learned about and observed. For example, in Dharan, I see modern dressed teenager, I see women wearing saris, I see different national costumes, I see military officers –  Basically, I see it all. And this town isn’t that big either, only 141,439 lives here (in Oslo it lives approximately 673,469. In comparison, my hometown Trondheim has a population of 193, 000 – Trondheim is not a big city in European scale – however it is the third largest in Norway). Although not big, I sometimes feel like I'm getting a bit of everything in this cozy, diverse town of Dharan.

At FK-Norway I found diversity… PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER WORLD was gathered to get to know each-other and exchange cultures. We even had a cultural evening and I was blown away by the different dances, songs and performances. I remember sitting there with Jørund Ungdomsdelegat. We were like two proud parents looking at our kids. Honestly, I think I gotten some wet eyes while I watched. It was so beautiful to see the diversity and energy from the huge group. A group from every corner of the world – working soooo good together. Diversity is KEY of successful programmes.

In my life I been surrounded by diversity – and this diversity around me I get energy from, I get excited of it – and it only makes me want more of it – It is my addiction – However, I perceive it as a gooooood addiction.

Please share your experience with us, either here in the comment box below, or write to us on our Facebook-profiles: Thanuya Ungdomsdelegat or Camilla Ungdomsdelegat. 

 

Cheers!

Camilla

When things aren’t as you expected

In September 2017 we were two excited girls who had a lot of questions and excitement. We had just signed a contract with the Norwegian Red Cross and were going on an exchange to Nepal, Sunsari District, Dharan for the next 9 months. When I told one of my friends the duration of the exchange – he simply answered by saying “yeah, so it kind a like a duration of a pregnancy”.

And yes, he was right. The beginning of the exchange was kind of bumping – everything was new and exciting; the mid part was a pure pleasure and we were in a good routine and now, the end is full of emotions and has made us reflect on how to wrap up activities, tasks and responsibilities with Nepal Red Cross Society. It is so strange to think about that we are home in Norway in under 1 month (!). The time has sure flied.

In the beginning we had a lot of questions. How were the Nepalese going to be like, will I miss my friends and family or how much will I grow as a colleague or as a person. As you might understand the questions in my head were a lot and not easy questions to answer (read: even with google by my side). Even though the questions are many, I have learned new things every day and feel like I have been here longer than 8 months. Being exposed to a new and different culture for a long time has been enjoyfull, fun, memorable but also a big learning curve. Learning how to cook food (read: surprisingly I never cooked before I sat my foot in the kitchen here in Nepal), expressing myself in a new language (read: body language sometimes), or learning a new working system to mention something. And no, I still haven’t figured out the answer to all those questions I had in the beginning of the exchange or am I capable of giving a fruitful answer to a person that has never been or lived in Nepal (read: you sure have missed out of something).

Though by getting to know the Nepalese people and introducing the Norwegian culture to them has really made me reflect on how different Nepal and Norway are. There are some things that are very different from back home and things that I will bring back to Norway.  

Are people in Norway like you? That’s a question I get quite often here in Nepal and the answer is definitely no. Not in appearance (read; in Norway we look very different from each other), but not in personality either. I perceive people in Nepal and Norway as very different. In Norway, especially Scandinavians, we are very introverted and like our "private space” – meaning that if we have a close group of friends we don’t necessary take initiative to talk to new people or people from aboard. You as a foreigner must therefore take initiative to get to know us. It will sure take some time to get to know us, but in comparison we are very friendly (read: especially in gatherings, parties or social events) when you first get to know us. We just need some time to adjust. 

What do you eat in Norway? Well, if you ask the people who knows me they will probably say something like “Thanuya never cooks and eat oatmeal for every meal” (read: especially since I have had some episodes with the fire alarm going off in my apartment while cooking). Well, that’s partly true. I never cooked back in Norway - so I am not the right person to ask if you want a good and fruitful answer to that question. But in general we Norwegians eat a lot of vegetables, bread and salmon fish (read: which we are very famous for. You can even find Norwegian salmon in restaurants in Kathmandu). As Norway is a diverse country we eat a lot of different dishes inspired from other countries – such as U.S, Italy, Thailand, India and Latin/South- America (read: in Norway we have something called “Taco-Friday” where we eat taco to dinner every Friday).  In Nepal they eat a lot of rice, spices and vegetables to every meal – which is very different from Norway (and yes, luckily for me they do have oatmeal in the store here).

Are people always on time in Norway? Well, the short answer is yes. If we have a meeting at 10am in Norway, you are there on time. 10am sharp. If not, you let the facilitator(s) know if you are 5min late or let them know if you can’t come at all (read: at least 1 day in advance). In Nepal there is an expression we learnt very early in our exchange, namely “nepali time”. Which means that if you have a meeting at 10am – you can expect people to show up at least 30min later. Of course, it sometimes has to do with traffic jam- but on the other side, that’s a new culture we quickly learned. The social environment and time management is something which is completely different in Nepal and Norway. Last week, when me and Camilla where 30min late (read: nepali late) our local boss Kiran said "WOW, you have really have adapted to the Nepali culture" - so yes, we have really tried to live by the nepali culture.

I could probably write page up and down of all the differences and similarities Norway and Nepal has (such as we simply don't have monkeys in the street of Norway). Reflecting on the process from the beginning of the exchange until now is sure a lot. Things haven't always been as I expected, but it feels very nice. Firstly, because some of the questions I had have been answered through my experience here – but also because I have made the most of it. Learning about myself, experiencing a new enviroment, friends, colleagues and living in Asia hasn’t always been a joy, but that’s what a culture exchange is all about. Memoring the good times and learning from each other. I will sure take back with me a lot of new experiences and friendships.

All the best,

Thanuya

 

Happy New Year 2075

YOUTH, REDCROSS AND NEW YEAR

2075 is about to unfold
with new opportunities to explore
more youth and more voice in the world
Red cross is welcoming all in its door

2075 is about to blast
with strength to share that we have
more to do and experience to share
makes us a Red cross active volunteer

2075 is the youth year
knowledge, skill and attitude to share
this is the red cross to help other
even if they don´t know me there

Youths for Humanity
Humanity to promote and maintain peace
this is what we serve being volunteer
and at last
i want to wish all of you
Happy new year

Written by Youth Team member, Kiran Tiwari (Keyrun Tiwari‎). 

Happy New Year!
Yes, you read right - today it is Nepali New Years, and today we are welcoming a new year with our dreams, hopes and wishes. 

Nepali New Year is an official public holiday in Nepal celebrated with parades, feasts, and family reunions. Nepali New Year is seen as a deeply religious holiday, thus various religious rites and a hope for blessings in the year ahead are a big part of the holiday's meaning. In the Hindu Temples across Nepal, many gather for morning prayer sessions and to workshop and offer food offerings to the gods. Because it exists more than 60 ethnic groups in Nepal, it is actually nine different New Years' Days in Nepal. However, today, the "national New Year" is celebrated. In international calendar we are in year 2018. However in Nepali calendar it is year 2075, which began in A.D 879, and the dates of this era are found on old Nepali coins, stone, and copper inscriptions, and official writings (Read more about the Nepali New Year on: https://publicholidays.asia/nepal/nepali-new-year/). 

2074 have been fruitful and rich with good memories, and I am sure 2075 will be as good - or maybe it even will become better! Make your dreams come true, and smile to the world<3


 

All the best for you, your friends, and family - take care and stay healthy<3

- Camilla

NAMASTE FUNDRAISING TEAM

When we first got to Nepal and meet the Red Cross youth volunteers in the district, we were very curious and had a lot of questions to ask the Youths. One of the questions we asked was: "How often do you have Red Cross activities in your circle"?. "Not that often", the youths would replay - followed by an explanation that the district or the youths dident have the money to hold the activites. But, money shouldent be an obstacle, we thought. One should rather find other methods to work on instead.

So, after some brainstorming with the Red Cross Youths and the Youth Team we created an idea to establish a Fundraising Team here in Dharan. The Fundraising Team would mainly work with establishing income generating activites (IGA) in their own Juniour or Youth Circle, but also help other circles in the district to establish IGA-activites/fundraising activites. The Fundraising Team was established 10th of March and is now a team of 6 members with different experience, gender, campuses ang age. They will work on the same ground as the Youth Team here in Dharan. 

On 7th of April the Fundraising Team had their first IGA-activity. The Teamleader of the Fundrasing Team, Asmina Limbu, and the Fundraising Team member Roshan came up with the idea to measure peoples BMI (Body mass index) and blood preasure, to sell waffles and tea on a stand here in the city center to collect an income. And with some planning in advance, our first IGA activity happend to be on the International Worlds Health day. 

Within 2hours the Fundraising Team, together with some others Red Cross Volunteers, managed to collect 1150nrs. Amazing, right? I am at least very impressed on how the Fundraising Team are working these days and how creative they are on establising IGA-activites. The money the Fundraising team collects will of course be put into a bank account and will be used within the Fundraising Team - but also if others Red Cross Circles need funding to do their activities. 

Anyways, do you need some ideas to get started? Well, then you can either contact our Fundraising Team on facebook or follow this blog. 

Stay tuned!

Thanuya

 

Seven months done - two more to go

Some things often strike you like a lightening from a clear blue sky. For me it was the moment when I realized that my mission as youth delegate in Nepal is soon over. It is really not long time until I am heading my nose back home to Norway. ONLY TWO MONTHS!

This feeling has been mixed for me. Because as much as I miss my friends, family and life in Norway - I have also established myself a life, gotten friends, and I even feel like I am part of a big, caring family in Nepal. 

So what to do in these situation? What should I do - or maybe even you, who are reading this post right now, also wonder what to do when these situations appears. My best advice is to embrace what is right in front of you. For me, that means for the next two months I will enjoy the nature in Dharan even more than I done before. I will stroll around the neighbourhood even more than I done before. I will wake up earlier in the morning, just to see the beautiful sunrise in Dharan, and I will also look for the perfect spots to see the stunning sunsets that Dharan has to offer. 

 Strolling around in the streets of Dharan

Strolling around in the streets of Dharan

This journey and mission that started in September 2017 have until now been great, and so memorable - and I look forward to make these two remaining months amazing, and live them to the fullest through the meaningful and rewarding work that we do as youth delegates together with inspiring youth volunteers and district office staff members. 

Take care of yourself, 

Love <3

- Camilla

 Goats in the sunrise

Goats in the sunrise

 

 

 Sunset from our balcony in Dharan

Sunset from our balcony in Dharan

LETS EAT

Namaste, 

I hope that you all are doing great and might be looking forward to spring (especially if you live in Norway these days). Here in Nepal its offically summer again, so the temprature is beginning to be above 30 celsius. I even sweat the 30meters we have to walk for work, so it is too hot  if you ask me. And yes, this is just the beginning of nepali summer...

Anyway, the past two weeks has been quite slow - or not that busy as we are use to. Instead of having 4-5 activites every week our main focus these past two week has been to train up our Youth Team in First Aid. As First Aid is quite important for our volunteers our goal has been to train them up so they will be able to train up other Red Cross youth volunteers later. The Youth Team have therefore been getting both basic and advanced First Aid training the last two weekands by our 4 Red Cross instructors. The next step is to give the Youth Team "training for facilitators- First Aid" so they are qualified as First Aid facilitators and can begin to train up other Red Cross Volunteers. Youths training up youths - thats the magic if you ask me!

 Thanuya and Camilla together with 2 out of 4 First Aid instructors.&nbsp;

Thanuya and Camilla together with 2 out of 4 First Aid instructors. 

 

Besite of having the First Aid training, we have also been working on translating some documents - or workshop manuals as we call them. Nistha, Bishal, Rachana and Susruth, who are some of our Red Cross Volunteers, have done an amazing job of translatning our manuals from English to Nepali. In that way the Red Cross Youths volunteers in Nepal will be able to hold the same workshop as me and Camilla, also after we leave for Norway in less than two months (!).

 Thanuya, Camilla and our LCP Kiran Sir together with our translators.

Thanuya, Camilla and our LCP Kiran Sir together with our translators.

Last week all the manuals were done, so me and Camilla decided to invite all the youth translators, the First-Aid instructors and our LCP Kiran Sir to go out for a dinner as a appreciation for their hard work. With our Youths we went to an Korean resturante - which is one of me and Camillas favorite resturants (eventhough they do not serve the typcial nepali dish "Daal Bhaat") here in Dharan and with our First-Aid instructors Aita, Deepica and Susajana we went to an resturant in a department store - which is brand new! 

We really enjoyed a lovely meal together and now we are looking forward to see the Youths training up the Youths very very soon :) Stay tuned or follow us on our facebook profiles Thanuya and Camilla to follow our journey.  

Have a nice day,

Thanuya

 

 

 

YOU CAN SAVE LIFE

YOU CAN SAVE LIFE

The knowledge and skills in basic first aid is beneficial for you, your family, friends, neighbours and local community. Because if an accident happens - you have the abilities to help and save life.

According to the Norwegian Red Cross' website, 5000 Norwegian annually, get cardiac arrest (when the heart sudden, sometimes temporary, stops beating), 3000 out of 5000 cardiac arrest happens outside the hospital. Easy techniques can keep a human alive until the ambulance arrives. 

In the Thailand Red Cross Society they works with youth volunteers aged 15-25 from schools, college, university, the Thai Ministry of Education's Office of Non-Formal and Informal Education and special groups of young people. In 2015, 18732 young people were registered as volunteers with the Thai Red Cross Society's Youth Bureau. Each had completed the Bureau's Basic Life Support: First Aid Training.

The best way of learning first aid, is by participating in a first aid course. After careful analysis and consideration together with the youth volunteers in Sunsari District, Nepal we found out that a big need in the local community is to increase knowledge and skills in first aid. Thus, we decided to provide the youth team and junior and youth Committee with basic First Aid training course. A follow-up plan is to make this group trainers in First Aid. In that way the Red Cross youth volunteers can train up other youth volunteers and others in their local community to save more lives wherever and whenever necessary. The photos below are from the three-day training in basic first aid course conducted between 16th-18th of March 2018. 

The emblem of Red Cross is a tribute to the founder of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement, Henry Dunant, and should ONLY be used by Red Cross/Crescent actors. The Red Cross is an official protective symbol, and is reserved as protective emblem for medical personnel and facilities in combat situation. For example if a pharmacy is using the Red Cross, and not the universal symbol of First Aid - it is a MISUSE, and must be reported.

 

Did you know that the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent is the largest first aid educator and provider in the world. Every year they train over 15 million people to become life savers. If you want to learn more about first aid online, please go to the following website: http://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/meetings-and-events/world-first-aid-day-2017/ 

 

Best of luck with your first aid! 

 

20140902-first-aid-banner.jpg
- Remember, the more you practice on your first aid knowledge and skills, the better you become - and more confidence you get in yourself.
Find a partner or a group of friends you can practice with on a regular basis. For example once a week or twice a month. 

- Camilla <3 <3

THE VOICE OF THE YOUTHS

Two weeks ago, from 22-26st of Feb, me and Camilla, were invited to attend a annual Youth Conference in Nepal. When we asked where this Conference was going to be held, the answer we got was " very very west". So, we packed our bags and went "very very west" - to a  district called Kaliali. Two local flights and 3 hours drive away, we were finally among 200 partcipants from all over Nepal.

The annual Conferance is something that the Nepal Red Cross has every year. The Youths all over Nepal gather together, share inspiration, ideas and not at least knowledge. One can compare it what the Norwegian Red Cross Youth call "SUK" (Sentral Ungdomskonferanse), which is held every October in Norway.

Me and Camilla had the pleasure to get to know a lot of different kind of youths, attend in a rally, to learn from a First Aid stimulation practice, admire some nepali dance and to meet different kind of staff members from ICRC and IFRC in Nepal. We were also asked to facilitate a parallel workshop to the participants. When we came to the conferance, we were very lucky to have our own translater and facilitator with us, named Kunal Mishra. Kunal has been a volunteer for the Red Cross Youth in Kathmandu for the last 5 years, so we felt very lucky to conduct the workshop with him. Our topic for the workshop was Sustainable Development goals and Youths,  where we had the pleasure to talk about this for almost 4 hours (and yes, without breaks). The youths worked together in groups and came up with their own suggestions on how they can work to reach SDGs. We were very proud to see the different suggestions and how active they were. Under you will see some photos from the Youth conferance (click on the photo to the right see more) 

Overall we learned a lot about the Red Cross youths in Nepal and how we can all inspire eachother to do more, reach further and learn more. Lets raise the voice of the youths together! 

Hope you are having a nice day, 

And remember, if you are eager to learn more about our work - please follow me or Camilla on our facebook profiles. 

Hugs Thanuya, 

 

 

NAMASTE LOCALS

I love traveling alone. It's when I travel alone that I get to know myself better and not least challenge myself beyond my comfort zones. It's when I travel alone that I'm most alive, most open to new ideas, new experiences and to meet new people. In those circumstances, I often have to force myself to think differently, to make an effort to learn a new language and not at least to get into a new culture. A new culture that might be very different than one had imagined. 

When you stay in the same country, in the same environment, you tend to be in the same comfort zone. You know your house, the city and have your own bestfriends. Friends that you probebly have known for a couple of years. And not at least, you're use to formulating yourself on your own mother tongue. As a foreigner in a new country, you dont have any of this. So, what can one do, you might wonder? Well, you just have to adapt. Learn to adapt. Adapt to something that is way beyond your comfort zone.

Sounds fun, right? After being in Nepal for almost 6 months, there is a lot of things that we have learned - both profesionally, but also personally. For example that there is never a meeting without tea and that nepalis prefer to eat the famous Daal Bhaat (rice with vegetables/meat) to every meal (and no, I am not kidding).

Besides that, I have also been reflecting on how people are, like for example that Nepalis and Norwegians are incredibly different when it comes to being social and take contact with "strangers", as we would say in Norway. In Nepal, people often take contact with you wherever you are - at the bus stop,  on hiking, at the shops etc - and I love it! Namaste from the locals whereever you are in Nepal - while in Norway, we prefer our personal space. 

In Dharan, where we live, I often go to different coffeeshops to read a book, but I think, I have never started to read a book before one or another tries to talk to me - which is very nice! People are very curious and very easy to get to know, at least from my point of view. Well, when I think of it, I actually think that all my local friends (outside of Red Cross) are from different cafes and random talkes (and yes, it might also be that I'm a little too addicted to coffee and reading books at cafes).

Do you force yourself outside of your comfortzone? If so, how does that feel? Are you curious about how me and Camilla are adapting in Nepal? If so, I encourge you to follow me and Camilla on Facebook. 

Namaste from Thanuya

IN LOVE WITH...FOOTBALL

 Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

I love football, but I think the Nepalis love football even more. Because everywhere I walk in Dharan, I can see people wearing clothes and accessorize marked with a football logo. T-skirts, pants, shorts, bags, cell-phone covers, caps, Tuk-tuk (Tempo/Safaris) and cars all with one thing in common - THE FOOTBALL LOGO. Logos are of teams like, Liverpool, Arsenal, Barchelona, Chelsea, Manchester United (sorry if I forgot to mention your team). Even our apartment have a huge logo of "The Gunners" (Arsenal's logo). Which is quite ironically, since my older brother is a HUGE Arsenal fan.

 Photos taken by Camilla Rodø

Photos taken by Camilla Rodø

I played football from the age of six years until 21. This year, it's been eight years since the last time I played football. Why so long ago, you may wonder? Especially regarding my love for this sport. The reasons why is because, for nine years ago I gotten a injury in my knee. After the recovery of my injury, I have played all other sports, besides football. 

Therefore, Thanuya and I got super excited, when we were asked to join Futsal. I felt it was about time to face my fear of becoming injured again.  So, after eight years, FINALLY, I felt ready play again. It was soooo fun, I got sooo much energic - and I really missed playing. 

Imagine, after eight years, I am finally playing the sport that I love. I had so much energy, maybe a bit too much energy, because I gave every kick 100 %. So, what do you think happens? I get injured again, hahah! My hamstring got strained... Hopefully it will not take another eight years until I play again. 

Instead of playing football, I will use this recovering time to work-out at the gym instead :---) Maybe practice my hang-ups. I want you to give me a challenge. So how many pull-ups do you think I will manage to do within four months? If you leave a comment and suggest a number, I am ready to achieve it.

 

Next weekend Thanuya and I will be going on the 38th Junior and Youth Circle National Seminar (conference) held in Kailali. We are super excited! We even have our own part about Youths and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Again, thanks a lot that you visit this blog. We appreciate any feedbacks. Until then, take care, laugh a lot, and enjoy life!

Love and peace,

Camilla


 

LETS TALK

energi.jpg

Do you agree with the expression "the key to a happy marriage is good communication"? Personally, I think that good communication is essential not only when creating a happy marriage. I also mean that good communication is crucial in different forms of relationship, e.g. between partners, family members, sport teams, co-workers, and organizations etc. Even though good communication is a key tool - my perception is that many (included myself) feels that good communication can be challenging to achieve. 

Being the worlds biggest humanitarian movement, there's no surprise that also the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement has challenges with communication. But don't fear, because good communication is something that can be learned. This is an objective Thanuya and I continuously are working towards. 

On the 10th of February a joint event in Nepal between three district chapters, Morang, Jhapa and Sunsari, was implemented. The purpose of the meeting was to improve and strengthen the cooperation and communication between different Red Cross youth volunteers across different districts in Eastern Nepal. This was done by exchanging and sharing activities, ideas, and experiences.

To illustrate the challenge with communication we did the activity "whisper-game". In the whisper-game, the facilitator whispered one word/sentence to a person, and that person had to pass the word/sentence to the person next to him/her. This continued until everyone had whispered the word. The last person who heard the word/sentence said it out load. Then you will find out if the word had changed during the circle or not.  Thereafter, we asked the participants "why do you think we did this game"? One of the youths explained it perfectly: "The point of the game is to understand that communication is important, but also challenging". After the whisper-game we made the youth volunteers sit in groups and discuss how to improve and strengthen communication between different Red Cross Youth Circles, Subchapters, and Districts Chapter in Nepal. 

This leads me back to the point that "good communication is something that can be learned". From groups discussions on Saturday the 10th of Feburary, we got several recommendations from the youths, on how to improve communication. So now the next step is to MAKE ACTION OUT OF THE RECOMMENDATION. Or as one of the Red Cross Youth slogan' says: "From LIKE to ACTION". If we dont make action out of our plans, we may risk that the situation unfortunately will remain unchanged. 

joint event.jpg

After the meeting one of the participant said it so nicely: "Today was an example on the RC/RC Movement Principle of unity - we are all working towards the same goal - to help our country". With that, I would like to end this blog post by giving a big thanks to every participant at the joint event. We are very eager to follow-up on the different plans of strengthening cooperation and communication between Red Cross youth volunteers in the three district chapters.

Please leave a comment if you have any questions.

 

Have a wonderful week!

 

Best,

Camilla



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DO YOU WANT TO BE THE NEXT YOUTH DELEGATE?

In 2015 I got the chance to meet Durga Bahing, who was a Youth Delegate from Nepal, Dharan to Norway, Telemark. Now, 3 years later, we have gotten the chance to get to know her even better here in Nepal. Since we get a lot of questions on how it is to be a Youth Delegate, I used the chance to  interview Durga on her experience in Norway.  

What made you apply to become a Youth Delegate? 

There are several reasons. One of the reason was the personal growth in myself during few years of volunteering experience in Red Cross. I was also more motivated and eliglible to apply as a volunteer, because I had worked with the Youth Delegates, Eline and Jonas, in Nepal the year before. 

How was it to be Youth Delegate in Norway?

I would define my experience of being a youth delegate as a journey of caterpillar into a butterfly. As a Youth Delegate we were nurtured, trained and given goals to achive. And we were never tired to keep doing more, trying every possibility and taking every challenge that made us grow personally and professionally. Apart from that, as interesting as a new culture, there were always great little things to do, learn or get to see almost every day when you are in a country so different from your own in every aspect.

Was your mission different than you had expected? If so, why?

It was defintely different than I had expected. The starting days were like standing out of comfort zone all the time, but in a good and constructive way. Of course it took sometime to get used to the place, the lifestyle, the language and the situations. Despite this, all in all, the end of mission was a great reflection of how things got better with time and patience. 

What was your biggest challenge when you lived in Norway?

I realized the biggest challenge would be me myself in ways like, how I choose to handle stressful situations, and who I choose to seek help from. 

What is your best memory from Norway?

I would just say three words; Christmas, skiing and the warmest company of the people.

I hope you enjoyed to get a little insight in how it was to be a Youth Delegate from Norway in Nepal. If you have any further questions or would like to be updated on our work, please follow the international blogs.  You can also stop by your District Chapter for questions - and if you are a Red Cross volunteer in Norway, please read about the application process here.

Have a nice day, 

Thanuya

 

 

 

DROP, COVER & HOLD!

Do you know what to do if an earthquake occurs? If yes, please share your experiences with your family, friends, neighbours and local community. If not, don't worry - because the youth teams' coordinator, Bishal Bhattarai, would happily demonstrate and explain the most important rules to remember in the videos below.

The rules on what to do if an earthquake occurs (in Nepali)

 In English:   Before an Earthquake:  &nbsp;1. Be prepared to act. Know how to act so your response is automatic. Identify safe places in your work area to ‘Drop, Cover and Hold On.’ Know at least two ways to exit the building safely after an earthquake.  2. Stock up on emergency supplies. Keep the basics: flashlight, first-aid kit, whistle, gloves, goggles, blankets and sturdy shoes. Coordinate supplies with your work group or department. Plan as if food and water may not be available for about 24 hours and other supplies for up to 3 days.  3. Arrange your work area for safety. Make sure that bookcases, large file cabinets and artwork are anchored. Store heavy objects on low shelves. Store breakable objects in cabinets with latches.&nbsp; Use normal work order process to get furniture anchored.   During an Earthquake:  &nbsp;4. Remain calm as the quake occurs – others will respond to your actions. A cool head can prevent panic. If you are indoors when the shaking occurs, stay there. Move away from windows and unsecured tall furniture. Drop, cover and hold on under a desk, a table or along an interior wall. Protect your head, neck and face. Stay under cover until the shaking stops and debris settles.  5. If you are outdoors, move to an open area away from falling hazards such as trees, power lines, and buildings. Drop to the ground and cover your head and neck.   After an Earthquake:  &nbsp;6. Remain calm and reassuring. Check yourself and other for injuries. Do not move injured people unless they are in danger. Use your training to provide first aid, use fire extinguishers, and clean up spills. In laboratories, safely shut down processes when possible.  7. Expect aftershocks. After large earthquakes, tremors and aftershocks can continue for days.  8. Be ready to act without electricity or lights. Know how to move around your work area and how to exit in the dark. Know how to access and use your emergency supplies. Be aware of objects that have shifted during the quake.&nbsp;&nbsp;  9. If you must leave a building, use extreme caution. Continually assess your surroundings and be on the lookout for falling debris and other hazards. Take your keys, personal items and emergency supplies with you if safe to do so. Do not re-enter damaged buildings until an all-clear is given.  10. Use telephones only to report a life-threatening emergency. Cell and hard-line phone systems will be jammed. Text messages take less band width and may go through when voice calls can’t be made.

In English:

Before an Earthquake:
 1. Be prepared to act. Know how to act so your response is automatic. Identify safe places in your work area to ‘Drop, Cover and Hold On.’ Know at least two ways to exit the building safely after an earthquake.

2. Stock up on emergency supplies. Keep the basics: flashlight, first-aid kit, whistle, gloves, goggles, blankets and sturdy shoes. Coordinate supplies with your work group or department. Plan as if food and water may not be available for about 24 hours and other supplies for up to 3 days.

3. Arrange your work area for safety. Make sure that bookcases, large file cabinets and artwork are anchored. Store heavy objects on low shelves. Store breakable objects in cabinets with latches.  Use normal work order process to get furniture anchored.

During an Earthquake:
 4. Remain calm as the quake occurs – others will respond to your actions. A cool head can prevent panic. If you are indoors when the shaking occurs, stay there. Move away from windows and unsecured tall furniture. Drop, cover and hold on under a desk, a table or along an interior wall. Protect your head, neck and face. Stay under cover until the shaking stops and debris settles.

5. If you are outdoors, move to an open area away from falling hazards such as trees, power lines, and buildings. Drop to the ground and cover your head and neck.

After an Earthquake:
 6. Remain calm and reassuring. Check yourself and other for injuries. Do not move injured people unless they are in danger. Use your training to provide first aid, use fire extinguishers, and clean up spills. In laboratories, safely shut down processes when possible.

7. Expect aftershocks. After large earthquakes, tremors and aftershocks can continue for days.

8. Be ready to act without electricity or lights. Know how to move around your work area and how to exit in the dark. Know how to access and use your emergency supplies. Be aware of objects that have shifted during the quake.  

9. If you must leave a building, use extreme caution. Continually assess your surroundings and be on the lookout for falling debris and other hazards. Take your keys, personal items and emergency supplies with you if safe to do so. Do not re-enter damaged buildings until an all-clear is given.

10. Use telephones only to report a life-threatening emergency. Cell and hard-line phone systems will be jammed. Text messages take less band width and may go through when voice calls can’t be made.

Thanks for sharing and following our blog! Leave a comment here or follow us on our Facebook profiles:  Camilla Ungdomsdelegat and Thanuya Ungdomsdelegat.

 

Cheers! Camilla

YOU GUYS ARE LUCKY

When I leave from Norway to work in the field, I'm often very excited about my colleagues. I ask questions like: Whom are the persons I will be work with? Are they nice? Are they direct? Will we be capable of working together? Well, the questions in my mind are many. My gut feeling is always scratching, my expecations often increase and I always do some information checking in advance (yes, I admit that I am one of those who do that). When we first arrived in Nepal we met our national coordinator, Bal Krishna Sedai Sir. He works at the Red Cross headquater in Kathmandu and has a lot of experience in organizational development. He was the one that gave us an introducation our first week in Kathmandu - and is the person that we inquire for advices.

Furthermore, when you work as youth delegate one have a leader in the district one are working in. This leader is our local contact person (hereafter LCP). This is a person employed by the National Society, one that knows the organization and context very well and is a person that will work very closely with the activities in the field. The LCP gives advices and contribute with insight on issues we don't have knowledge about. She or he has the local knowledge - while we often contribute with the knowledge from our national society. Together we work to reach our goals with the youths. 

 Photo of our LCP Kiran Kari.&nbsp; Photo by:&nbsp; Camilla Rodø

Photo of our LCP Kiran Kari.  Photo by:  Camilla Rodø

In Nepal we have been fortunate to get to know our LCP, Kiran Karki. Kiran has worked 16 years in the Nepal Red Cross. He was also the LCP for the former youth delegates, Jonas and Eline, who worked and lived in Dharan from 2014-2015. Kiran, as we know him, is a very humble person. As the only one with extra responsibility in our district chapter office, he often works extra. This might be because he always say yes to help - which often means that he set aside his own things on the agenda.  

Most of the people in Dharan knows Kiran really well – and as many has referred to “you guys are very lucky to work with Kiran”. And yes, we know! We could not asked for a better local contact person.

Is there anything that we have learned about Kiran is that the loves tea. However, this applies to all Nepalis. If there is one thing we have learned in Nepal it is the importance of tea (with a LOT of sugar). If you want participants to come on time, you must order some tea. You can not have a snack without tea. Breakfast is tea. Lunch is tea. Dinner might also be tea. And if you want to socialize, then go and drink tea.

Anyways, now I have to go and drink some tea (trying my best to integrate). Please keep following me and Camilla on Facebook to be updated on our work. This week we will also be on Snapchat, so you are welcome to add “rodekors.no” on snapchat and get a insight to our work in the field.

Lots of love from,

Thanuya  

 

YOUTH TEAM 2017/2018

To all of our readers out there; please welcome and say hi to our Youth Team in Sunsari District Chapter, Nepal! This fantastic group of inspiring and motivating youths were elected on the 11th of November 2017 by other Red Cross youth volunteers in the district.

This youth team is using their leisure time to take extra responsibility to do something good for their neighbourhood, school, community and district. Together we are working towards the goal of being everywhere for everyone in Sunsari District Chapter. 

Coordinator, Bishal Bhattarai.

Bishal was a member of the previous youth team in 2014-2015. He has many years experience of volunteering and wants to learn more advanced first aid training - in order to provide other volunteers first aid training.

 Bishal Bhattarai.&nbsp; Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Bishal Bhattarai.  Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Treasurer/Accounter, Yogesh Giri.

Yogesh has experience from speaking in radio and education in budgeting and management. He look forward to increase his knowledge in the Red Cross movement and to train volunteers. He also has a big eager to learn more about how one can develop income generating activities to meet the needs in the community.

 Yogesh Giri. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Yogesh Giri. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Trainer, Tripura Bhandari.

Tripura is great in public speaking, and have a lot of experience in the Red Cross. Her clear and strong voice is essential when disseminating about the Red Cross Movement, values and principles. She is eager to learn more about different Red Cross activities.

 Tripura Bhandari. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Tripura Bhandari. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Trainer, Kiran Tiwari.

Kiran has a lot of  experiences in the Red Cross and is a guy that never says no to anything - which means that he always has something to do. Kiran look forward to develop his skills in participatory methods in a Red Cross context.

 Kiran Tiwari. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Kiran Tiwari. Photo taken by Camilla Rodø

Member, ASMITA Balkumari KHATRI. 

Asmita Balkumari  has a lot of experience in the Red Cross. She was also a member of the previous Youth-Team in 2014-2015.  She has a lot of experience in training in sexual/young health, first aid, climate change and orgaization development. She hope to develop more knowledge and skills in the Red Cross movement.

 Asmita Khatri Balkumari. Photo by: Camilla Rodø

Asmita Khatri Balkumari. Photo by: Camilla Rodø

Member, Subodh Dotel.

Subodh has experience as a Red Cross youth. Furthermore, he is good in training children, and working with youths. Subodh is eager to develop skills in first aid training to teach his own youth Red Cross circle and community.

 Subodh Dotel. Photo by: Camilla Rodø&nbsp;

Subodh Dotel. Photo by: Camilla Rodø 

youth team 2017/2018 together with the youth delegates

 Photo taken by Shivaram Khadka. From left, Subodh, Tripura, Thanuya, Balkumari, Bishal, Kiran, Yogesh and Camilla.

Photo taken by Shivaram Khadka. From left, Subodh, Tripura, Thanuya, Balkumari, Bishal, Kiran, Yogesh and Camilla.

Thanks for sharing and following our blog! Leave a comment here or follow us on our Facebook profiles:  Camilla Ungdomsdelegat and Thanuya Ungdomsdelegat.

 

Cheers! Camilla

Merry Christmas!

(Scroll down for English)

क्रिसमस। क्रिसमस साँच्चै के हो? यो पर्व ईसाई परम्परा संग जोडीको छ - र नर्वे एक ईसाई देश हो, त्यसैले यस चाडलाई नर्वेमा हर्षउलासका साथ मनाईन्छ। नर्वेमा क्रिसमसलाई महत्वपूर्ण चाडका रुपमा हेरिने भएकाले यस चाड मनाउनको लागि एक महिना अघि देखि तयारी सुरु गरिन्छ। यस चाड मनाउन बिभिन्न किसिमका केकहरु बनाउनुका साथै घर सरसफाई गरि विभिन्न किसिमका रंगीबिरंगी बत्तिहरुले सझाऊने गरिन्छ साथसाथै क्रिसमस रुखलाई पनि रंगीबिरंगी र कागजका खेलौना राखी सझाइन्छ। परिवार,आफन्त र साथीभाइहरु सग क्रिसमस पार्टीमा जन्ने गरिन्छ(जस्लाई नोर्वेजियनमा "ज्युल्डबोर्ड" भनिन्छ) अनी आफ्ना नजिकका मानिसहरुलाई उपहार दिई एकआपसमा शुभकामना साटासाटा गरिन्छ

यस चाडमा डिसेम्बर महिना लागे सगै क्रिसमसका दिनहरु गन्ने चलन समेत रहेको छ 24 डिसेम्बर लाई क्रिसमस इभ भनिन्छ, साथै यस साझलाई नर्वेमा चमत्कारि साझका रुपमा लिन्छन्। यस चाड मनाउन विभिन्न ठाउँमा बस्दै आएका परिवार,आफन्त र साथीभाईहरु भेला भइ विभिन्न खाले क्रिसमस चलचित्रहरू हेर्ने,मिठोमिठो खानेकुराहरु खाने, आफुले पाएको क्रिसमस-गिफ्टहरु खोल्ने र क्रिसमस रूखमा गइ त्यसको वरिपरि घुम्ने गरिन्छ । यस पर्वलाई नेपालमा सेप्टेम्बर महिनामा मनाईने दशैं र तिहार चाड सग तुलना गर्न सकिन्छ।

यस ब्लग पोस्ट लेख्दै गर्दा हामी क्रिसमस र नयाँ वर्ष मनाउन श्रीलंका र भारत को यात्रामा रहन्छौ।जहाँ हामी आफ्ना परिवार,आफन्त र साथीहरू सग भेटघाट गरि उनीहरु सग मिठामिठा खानेकुरा खाई रमाइलो गर्दै हाम्रा छुट्टीका केहि  दिनहरु उनीहरु सगै बिताउछौ।

आशा गर्छौं हजुरहरुले यसरी नै हाम्रो ब्लग पोष्टलाई २०१८ मा पनि पढी सल्लहासुझाब दिनुहुन्छ र सम्पुर्णमा आउदै गरेको क्रिसमस अनि नयाँ बर्ष २०१८ को हार्दिक शुभकामना व्यत्त गर्दछौ !

लोवे फ्रोम Thanuya र Camilla, 

Photos by: Thanuya Sivanantharajah and Camilla Rodø

English:

Christmas. What is Christmas really? This holiday is associated with Christian traditions - and it is celebrated with a great joy. In Norway we often look forward to Christmas for several weeks. 4 weeks to be specific. During these four weeks, we bake cakes, the house is being washed and decorated, we go to Christmas parties (so called “julebord” in Norwegian) with family and friends and not least we buy Christmas presents to friends and relatives.

December 24th is the most magical day during the year in Norway. We gather family from different places, watch different Christmas movies in the mornings, sing some Christmas carols (songs), eat delicious food and open Christmas presents on Christmas Eve. It can be compared to “Dosai” and “Tihar” festival in Nepal during September. To get some of the "Christmas-feeling" we gathered some of the Youths in Dharan to have a Christmas evening with us on 16th of December. We eat porridge, listen to Christmas songs and socialized.

As we are writing this blogpost we are on our way to Sri Lanka and India to celebrate Christmas and New Year. There we will meet family and friends, eat good food and enjoy a few days holiday before 2018 kicks in. We really hope you still want to read this blog in 2018 - and wish all our readers out there a:

"MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR!"

Love from Thanuya and Camilla,

Being sick in the field

The time is 0530am. After being sick all night, I get up to the sound of the cow’s daily call, "MØØ", the little neighbour boy who screams to his sister to hurry up to school and not at least a car parked right outside our apartment with loudspeakers (if you’re lucky it isn’t loud Bollywood music). This have made me appreciate the statutory law rules (e.g. no noise after 7am) in apartment complexes in Norway even more these days. When you are surrounded by this in the morning, you know it’s time to get up and start your day in Nepal.

But when you are sick, have high fever, nausea and zero energy to get up its pretty difficult to just "get up". The world's worst feeling and the world's worst way to get up in general. You might know the feeling of being sick in your own country and bedroom? Well, being sick in Nepal (or abroad), I don’t envy anyone. The atmosphere is completely different when you are sick aboard than in our own home. The food doesn’t taste the same anymore and you’re no longer surrounded by the things you usually love. The bed is hard (stone-hard), the medicine does not work the same way and what you really want is to enjoy the sun. But instead, you have to go to the hospital to describe your symptoms in a foreign language to your local doctor.

24581324_10155707516415985_653879290_n.jpg

Some glimts of being sick in field

Photos of the local hospital in Dharan, "Toro"- soups packages from Norway and not at least my creating food making. Photos by: Thanuya Sivanantharajah

To give you a little pointer on how my sick days have been:

  • 0530am: Wake up to the cows sounds and loudspeakers outside my bedroom.
  • 0540am: Take some medicines and then plug in my earplugs and try to fall asleep again.
  • 09am: Get up and try to eat some breakfast. Its not more inspiring than white bread (reminds me of hamburger bread in Norway) and green tea.
  • 10am: Get picked up by my great colleagues to go to the hospital. After 5 hours of queue and testes, I can finally go home.
  • 3pm: Time to eat lunch. Soups becomes the alternative (Who would have guessed that the “Toro”- packages from Norway could come to a rescue - so a BIG thanks to our boss Juma who brought it with him from Norway)
  • 3 pm-8pm: Sleep
  • 8pm: Talk to my co-delegate Camilla (if my breath allows it) and then dinner. Again, it will be white bread and tea. However, sickness has made me a little more creative in cooking, so white bread with cinnamon becomes the solution.
  • 9pm: Energy is on the bottom again, so its time to say good night.

Well, at the time of this blogpost writing, I finally have some energy, so I am looking forward to read some books again and go back to work - the youths energy are definitely missed! My warmest book recommendation goes to "The Gurkhas Daughter" by Prajwel Parajuly if you want to be a little Nepal inspired. Otherwise I would recommand you to follow me and Camilla on facebook. 

Hope you all are well, 

Hugs Thanuya

 

Stairways to Heaven

Everywhere I am in the world I always seem to find a stair.

Someone is weak for chocolate, chips, ice-cream, movies, football, you name it. Of course, I am also weak for these things. However, there are some things I am more in favour of than the aforementioned. Especially one activity. Namely, I am very weak for running and exercising in stairs.

My favourite workout activity is to run, jump and do exercises in stairs. Thus, when travelling to another city or new country I am always on the “hunt for” a new favourite stairway I can work out in.

Below, you can see few examples on stairs I have found on my travels to different cities in Norway, and elsewhere in the world.

Why do I love so much to exercise in stairs?

  •           Variety
  •           Fun
  •           Exhausting
  •           Social when doing it with friends
  •           Using the whole body
  •           On the top there’s always a beautiful view waiting for me to enjoy.
  •           Its free - don't cost any money to work out in stairs

Where do I find the stairs?

  •           Stadiums (football, tennis, rugby etc.)
  •           Ski-jump arenas
  •           In nature
  •           In the cities
  •           Inside buildings

 

What work-out activity do you like the most? Please tell me – I would love to try it out as well 😊

 

Thanks for sharing and following our blog! Leave a comment here or follow us on our Facebook profiles:  Camilla Ungdomsdelegat and Thanuya Ungdomsdelegat.

 

Jumping loves from stair-lover, Camilla

 

Photo sources:

http://www.skisprungschanzen.com/EN/Articles/0057-Granåsen+large+hill+seriously+damaged